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Ospf Workgroup RFCs

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RFC1245 - OSPF Protocol Analysis
This report attempts to summarize the key features of OSPF V2. It also attempts to analyze how the protocol will perform and scale in the Internet. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify any Internet standard.
RFC1246 - Experience with the OSPF Protocol
This report documents experience with OSPF V2. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience, simulations and the current state of OSPF implementations. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify any Internet standard.
RFC1247 - OSPF Version 2
This memo documents version 2 of the OSPF protocol. OSPF is a link- state based routing protocol. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC1252 - OSPF Version 2 Management Information Base
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets. In particular, it defines objects for managing OSPF Version 2. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC1586 - Guidelines for Running OSPF Over Frame Relay Networks
This memo specifies guidelines for implementors and users of the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol to bring about improvements in how the protocol runs over frame relay networks. This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.
RFC1587 - The OSPF NSSA Option
This document describes a new optional type of OSPF area, somewhat humorously referred to as a "not-so-stubby" area (or NSSA). NSSAs are similar to the existing OSPF stub area configuration option but have the additional capability of importing AS external routes in a limited fashion. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC1765 - OSPF Database Overflow
This memo details a way of gracefully handling unanticipated database overflows. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.
RFC1793 - Extending OSPF to Support Demand Circuits
This memo defines enhancements to the OSPF protocol that allow efficient operation over "demand circuits". [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC1850 - OSPF Version 2 Management Information Base
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets. In particular, it defines objects for managing the Open Shortest Path First Routing Protocol. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2096 - IP Forwarding Table MIB
This memo defines an update to RFC 1354. The significant difference between this MIB and RFC 1354 is the recognition (explicitly discussed but by consensus left to future work) that CIDR routes may have the same network number but different network masks. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2178 - OSPF Version 2
This memo documents version 2 of the OSPF protocol. OSPF is a link-state routing protocol. It is designed to be run internal to a single Autonomous System. Each OSPF router maintains an identical database describing the Autonomous System's topology. From this database, a routing table is calculated by constructing a shortest-path tree.
OSPF recalculates routes quickly in the face of topological changes, utilizing a minimum of routing protocol traffic. OSPF provides support for equal-cost multipath. An area routing capability is provided, enabling an additional level of routing protection and a reduction in routing protocol traffic. In addition, all OSPF routing protocol exchanges are authenticated. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2328 - OSPF Version 2
This memo documents version 2 of the OSPF protocol. OSPF is a link- state routing protocol. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2329 - OSPF Standardization Report
This memo documents how the requirements for advancing a routing protocol to Full Standard have been met for OSPFv2. This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.
RFC2370 - The OSPF Opaque LSA Option
This memo defines enhancements to the OSPF protocol to support a new class of link-state advertisements (LSA) called Opaque LSAs. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2676 - QoS Routing Mechanisms and OSPF Extensions
This memo describes extensions to the OSPF protocol to support QoS routes. The focus of this document is on the algorithms used to compute QoS routes and on the necessary modifications to OSPF to support this function, e.g., the information needed, its format, how it is distributed, and how it is used by the QoS path selection process. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC2740 - OSPF for IPv6
This document describes the modifications to OSPF to support version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPv6). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC2844 - OSPF over ATM and Proxy-PAR
This memo specifies, for OSPF implementors and users, mechanisms describing how the protocol operates in ATM networks over PVC (Permanent Virtual Connections) and SVC (Switched Virtual Circuit) meshes with the presence of Proxy-PAR (PNNI Augmented Routing). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC3101 - The OSPF Not-So-Stubby Area (NSSA) Option
This memo documents an optional type of Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) area that is somewhat humorously referred to as a "not-so-stubby" area (or NSSA). NSSAs are similar to the existing OSPF stub area configuration option but have the additional capability of importing AS external routes in a limited fashion. The OSPF NSSA Option was originally defined in RFC 1587. The functional differences between this memo and RFC 1587 are explained in Appendix F. All differences, while expanding capability, are backward-compatible in nature. Implementations of this memo and of RFC 1587 will interoperate. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3137 - OSPF Stub Router Advertisement
This memo describes a backward-compatible technique that may be used by OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) implementations to advertise unavailability to forward transit traffic or to lower the preference level for the paths through such a router. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3509 - Alternative Implementations of OSPF Area Border Routers
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a link-state intra-domain routing protocol used for routing in IP networks. Though the definition of the Area Border Router (ABR) in the OSPF specification does not require a router with multiple attached areas to have a backbone connection, it is actually necessary to provide successful routing to the inter-area and external destinations. If this requirement is not met, all traffic destined for the areas not connected to such an ABR or out of the OSPF domain, is dropped. This document describes alternative ABR behaviors implemented in Cisco and IBM routers. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3623 - Graceful OSPF Restart
This memo documents an enhancement to the OSPF routing protocol, whereby an OSPF router can stay on the forwarding path even as its OSPF software is restarted. This is called "graceful restart" or "non-stop forwarding". A restarting router may not be capable of adjusting its forwarding in a timely manner when the network topology changes. In order to avoid the possible resulting routing loops, the procedure in this memo automatically reverts to a normal OSPF restart when such a topology change is detected, or when one or more of the restarting router's neighbors do not support the enhancements in this memo. Proper network operation during a graceful restart makes assumptions upon the operating environment of the restarting router; these assumptions are also documented.
RFC3630 - Traffic Engineering (TE) Extensions to OSPF Version 2
This document describes extensions to the OSPF protocol version 2 to support intra-area Traffic Engineering (TE), using Opaque Link State Advertisements.
RFC3883 - Detecting Inactive Neighbors over OSPF Demand Circuits (DC)
OSPF is a link-state intra-domain routing protocol used in IP networks. OSPF behavior over demand circuits (DC) is optimized in RFC 1793 to minimize the amount of overhead traffic. A part of the OSPF demand circuit extensions is the Hello suppression mechanism. This technique allows a demand circuit to go down when no interesting traffic is going through the link. However, it also introduces a problem, where it becomes impossible to detect an OSPF-inactive neighbor over such a link. This memo introduces a new mechanism called "neighbor probing" to address the above problem. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4136 - OSPF Refresh and Flooding Reduction in Stable Topologies
This document describes an extension to the OSPF protocol to reduce periodic flooding of Link State Advertisements (LSAs) in stable topologies.
Current OSPF behavior requires that all LSAs, except DoNotAge LSAs, to be refreshed every 30 minutes. This document proposes to generalize the use of DoNotAge LSAs in order to reduce protocol traffic in stable topologies. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4167 - Graceful OSPF Restart Implementation Report
Graceful OSPF Restart, as specified in RFC 3623, provides a mechanism whereby an OSPF router can stay on the forwarding path even as its OSPF software is restarted. This document provides an implementation report for this extension to the base OSPF protocol. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4222 - Prioritized Treatment of Specific OSPF Version 2 Packets and Congestion Avoidance
This document recommends methods that are intended to improve the scalability and stability of large networks using Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Version 2 protocol. The methods include processing OSPF Hellos and Link State Advertisement (LSA) Acknowledgments at a higher priority compared to other OSPF packets, and other congestion avoidance procedures. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC4552 - Authentication/Confidentiality for OSPFv3
This document describes means and mechanisms to provide authentication/confidentiality to OSPFv3 using an IPv6 Authentication Header/Encapsulating Security Payload (AH/ESP) extension header. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4576 - Using a Link State Advertisement (LSA) Options Bit to Prevent Looping in BGP/MPLS IP Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
This document specifies a procedure that deals with a particular issue that may arise when a Service Provider (SP) provides "BGP/MPLS IP VPN" service to a customer and the customer uses OSPFv2 to advertise its routes to the SP. In this situation, a Customer Edge (CE) Router and a Provider Edge (PE) Router are OSPF peers, and customer routes are sent via OSPFv2 from the CE to the PE. The customer routes are converted into BGP routes, and BGP carries them across the backbone to other PE routers. The routes are then converted back to OSPF routes sent via OSPF to other CE routers. As a result of this conversion, some of the information needed to prevent loops may be lost. A procedure is needed to ensure that once a route is sent from a PE to a CE, the route will be ignored by any PE that receives it back from a CE. This document specifies the necessary procedure, using one of the options bits in the LSA (Link State Advertisements) to indicate that an LSA has already been forwarded by a PE and should be ignored by any other PEs that see it. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4750 - OSPF Version 2 Management Information Base
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets. In particular, it defines objects for managing version 2 of the Open Shortest Path First Routing Protocol. Version 2 of the OSPF protocol is specific to the IPv4 address family. Version 3 of the OSPF protocol is specific to the IPv6 address family.
This memo obsoletes RFC 1850; however, it is designed to be backwards compatible. The functional differences between this memo and RFC 1850 are explained in Appendix B. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4915 - Multi-Topology (MT) Routing in OSPF
This document describes an extension to Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) in order to define independent IP topologies called Multi- Topologies (MTs). The Multi-Topologies extension can be used for computing different paths for unicast traffic, multicast traffic, different classes of service based on flexible criteria, or an in- band network management topology.
An optional extension to exclude selected links from the default topology is also described. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4940 - IANA Considerations for OSPF
This memo creates a number of OSPF registries and provides guidance to IANA for assignment of code points within these registries. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC4970 - Extensions to OSPF for Advertising Optional Router Capabilities
It is useful for routers in an OSPFv2 or OSPFv3 routing domain to know the capabilities of their neighbors and other routers in the routing domain. This document proposes extensions to OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 for advertising optional router capabilities. A new Router Information (RI) Link State Advertisement (LSA) is proposed for this purpose. In OSPFv2, the RI LSA will be implemented with a new opaque LSA type ID. In OSPFv3, the RI LSA will be implemented with a new LSA type function code. In both protocols, the RI LSA can be advertised at any of the defined flooding scopes (link, area, or autonomous system (AS)). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5185 - OSPF Multi-Area Adjacency
This document describes an extension to the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol to allow a single physical link to be shared by multiple areas. This is necessary to allow the link to be considered an intra-area link in multiple areas. This would create an intra- area path in each of the corresponding areas sharing the same link. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5187 - OSPFv3 Graceful Restart
This document describes the OSPFv3 graceful restart. The OSPFv3 graceful restart is identical to that of OSPFv2 except for the differences described in this document. These differences include the format of the grace Link State Advertisements (LSAs) and other considerations. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5250 - The OSPF Opaque LSA Option
This document defines enhancements to the OSPF protocol to support a new class of link state advertisements (LSAs) called Opaque LSAs. Opaque LSAs provide a generalized mechanism to allow for the future extensibility of OSPF. Opaque LSAs consist of a standard LSA header followed by application-specific information. The information field may be used directly by OSPF or by other applications. Standard OSPF link-state database flooding mechanisms are used to distribute Opaque LSAs to all or some limited portion of the OSPF topology.
This document replaces RFC 2370 and adds to it a mechanism to enable an OSPF router to validate Autonomous System (AS)-scope Opaque LSAs originated outside of the router's OSPF area. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5329 - Traffic Engineering Extensions to OSPF Version 3
This document describes extensions to OSPFv3 to support intra-area Traffic Engineering (TE). This document extends OSPFv2 TE to handle IPv6 networks. A new TLV and several new sub-TLVs are defined to support IPv6 networks. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5340 - OSPF for IPv6
This document describes the modifications to OSPF to support version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPv6). The fundamental mechanisms of OSPF (flooding, Designated Router (DR) election, area support, Short Path First (SPF) calculations, etc.) remain unchanged. However, some changes have been necessary, either due to changes in protocol semantics between IPv4 and IPv6, or simply to handle the increased address size of IPv6. These modifications will necessitate incrementing the protocol version from version 2 to version 3. OSPF for IPv6 is also referred to as OSPF version 3 (OSPFv3).
Changes between OSPF for IPv4, OSPF Version 2, and OSPF for IPv6 as described herein include the following. Addressing semantics have been removed from OSPF packets and the basic Link State Advertisements (LSAs). New LSAs have been created to carry IPv6 addresses and prefixes. OSPF now runs on a per-link basis rather than on a per-IP-subnet basis. Flooding scope for LSAs has been generalized. Authentication has been removed from the OSPF protocol and instead relies on IPv6's Authentication Header and Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP).
Even with larger IPv6 addresses, most packets in OSPF for IPv6 are almost as compact as those in OSPF for IPv4. Most fields and packet- size limitations present in OSPF for IPv4 have been relaxed. In addition, option handling has been made more flexible.
All of OSPF for IPv4's optional capabilities, including demand circuit support and Not-So-Stubby Areas (NSSAs), are also supported in OSPF for IPv6. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5449 - OSPF Multipoint Relay (MPR) Extension for Ad Hoc Networks
This document specifies an OSPFv3 interface type tailored for mobile ad hoc networks. This interface type is derived from the broadcast interface type, and is denoted the "OSPFv3 MANET interface type". This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5613 - OSPF Link-Local Signaling
OSPF is a link-state intra-domain routing protocol. OSPF routers exchange information on a link using packets that follow a well-defined fixed format. The format is not flexible enough to enable new features that need to exchange arbitrary data. This document describes a backward-compatible technique to perform link-local signaling, i.e., exchange arbitrary data on a link. This document replaces the experimental specification published in RFC 4813 to bring it on the Standards Track.
RFC5614 - Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Extension of OSPF Using Connected Dominating Set (CDS) Flooding
This document specifies an extension of OSPFv3 to support mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). The extension, called OSPF-MDR, is designed as a new OSPF interface type for MANETs. OSPF-MDR is based on the selection of a subset of MANET routers, consisting of MANET Designated Routers (MDRs) and Backup MDRs. The MDRs form a connected dominating set (CDS), and the MDRs and Backup MDRs together form a biconnected CDS for robustness. This CDS is exploited in two ways. First, to reduce flooding overhead, an optimized flooding procedure is used in which only (Backup) MDRs flood new link state advertisements (LSAs) back out the receiving interface; reliable flooding is ensured by retransmitting LSAs along adjacencies. Second, adjacencies are formed only between (Backup) MDRs and a subset of their neighbors, allowing for much better scaling in dense networks. The CDS is constructed using 2-hop neighbor information provided in a Hello protocol extension. The Hello protocol is further optimized by allowing differential Hellos that report only changes in neighbor states. Options are specified for originating router-LSAs that provide full or partial topology information, allowing overhead to be reduced by advertising less topology information. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5642 - Dynamic Hostname Exchange Mechanism for OSPF
This document defines a new OSPF Router Information (RI) TLV that allows OSPF routers to flood their hostname-to-Router-ID mapping information across an OSPF network to provide a simple and dynamic mechanism for routers running OSPF to learn about symbolic hostnames, just like for routers running IS-IS. This mechanism is applicable to both OSPFv2 and OSPFv3. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5643 - Management Information Base for OSPFv3
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in IPv6-based internets. In particular, it defines objects for managing the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Routing Protocol for IPv6, otherwise known as OSPF version 3 (OSPFv3). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5709 - OSPFv2 HMAC-SHA Cryptographic Authentication
This document describes how the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secure Hash Standard family of algorithms can be used with OSPF version 2's built-in, cryptographic authentication mechanism. This updates, but does not supercede, the cryptographic authentication mechanism specified in RFC 2328. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5786 - Advertising a Router's Local Addresses in OSPF Traffic Engineering (TE) Extensions
OSPF Traffic Engineering (TE) extensions are used to advertise TE Link State Advertisements (LSAs) containing information about TE-enabled links. The only addresses belonging to a router that are advertised in TE LSAs are the local addresses corresponding to TE-enabled links, and the local address corresponding to the Router ID.
In order to allow other routers in a network to compute Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineered Label Switched Paths (TE LSPs) to a given router's local addresses, those addresses must also be advertised by OSPF TE.
This document describes procedures that enhance OSPF TE to advertise a router's local addresses. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5820 - Extensions to OSPF to Support Mobile Ad Hoc Networking
This document describes extensions to OSPF to support mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). The extensions, called OSPF-OR (OSPF-Overlapping Relay), include mechanisms for link-local signaling (LLS), an OSPF-MANET interface, a simple technique to reduce the size of Hello packets by only transmitting incremental state changes, and a method for optimized flooding of routing updates. OSPF-OR also provides a means to reduce unnecessary adjacencies to support larger MANETs. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5838 - Support of Address Families in OSPFv3
This document describes a mechanism for supporting multiple address families (AFs) in OSPFv3 using multiple instances. It maps an AF to an OSPFv3 instance using the Instance ID field in the OSPFv3 packet header. This approach is fairly simple and minimizes extensions to OSPFv3 for supporting multiple AFs. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6506 - Supporting Authentication Trailer for OSPFv3
Currently, OSPF for IPv6 (OSPFv3) uses IPsec as the only mechanism for authenticating protocol packets. This behavior is different from authentication mechanisms present in other routing protocols (OSPFv2, Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS), RIP, and Routing Information Protocol Next Generation (RIPng)). In some environments, it has been found that IPsec is difficult to configure and maintain and thus cannot be used. This document defines an alternative mechanism to authenticate OSPFv3 protocol packets so that OSPFv3 does not only depend upon IPsec for authentication. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6549 - OSPFv2 Multi-Instance Extensions
OSPFv3 includes a mechanism to support multiple instances of the protocol running on the same interface. OSPFv2 can utilize such a mechanism in order to support multiple routing domains on the same subnet.
This document defines the OSPFv2 Instance ID to enable separate OSPFv2 protocol instances on the same interface. Unlike OSPFv3 where the Instance ID can be used for multiple purposes, such as putting the same interface in multiple areas, the OSPFv2 Instance ID is reserved for identifying protocol instances.
This document updates RFC 2328. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6845 - OSPF Hybrid Broadcast and Point-to-Multipoint Interface Type
This document describes a mechanism to model a broadcast network as a hybrid of broadcast and point-to-multipoint networks for purposes of OSPF operation. Neighbor discovery and maintenance as well as Link State Advertisement (LSA) database synchronization are performed using the broadcast model, but the network is represented using the point-to-multipoint model in the router-LSAs of the routers connected to it. This allows an accurate representation of the cost of communication between different routers on the network, while maintaining the network efficiency of broadcast operation. This approach is relatively simple and requires minimal changes to OSPF.
This document updates both OSPFv2 (RFC 2328) and OSPFv3 (RFC 5340). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6860 - Hiding Transit-Only Networks in OSPF
A transit-only network is defined as a network connecting routers only. In OSPF, transit-only networks are usually configured with routable IP addresses, which are advertised in Link State Advertisements (LSAs) but are not needed for data traffic. In addition, remote attacks can be launched against routers by sending packets to these transit-only networks. This document presents a mechanism to hide transit-only networks to speed up network convergence and reduce vulnerability to remote attacks.
In the context of this document, 'hiding' implies that the prefixes are not installed in the routing tables on OSPF routers. In some cases, IP addresses may still be visible when using OSPFv2.
This document updates RFCs 2328 and 5340. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6969 - OSPFv3 Instance ID Registry Update
This document modifies the "Unassigned" number space in the IANA "OSPFv3 Instance ID Address Family Values" registry by dividing it in two halves -- one half Unassigned but managed via Standards Action, and the other Reserved for Private Use. It updates RFC 5838.
RFC6987 - OSPF Stub Router Advertisement
This document describes a backward-compatible technique that may be used by OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) implementations to advertise a router's unavailability to forward transit traffic or to lower the preference level for the paths through such a router.
This document obsoletes RFC 3137.
RFC6992 - Routing for IPv4-Embedded IPv6 Packets
This document describes a routing scenario where IPv4 packets are transported over an IPv6 network, based on the methods described in RFCs 6145 and 6052, along with a separate OSPFv3 routing table for IPv4-embedded IPv6 routes in the IPv6 network.
RFC7038 - Use of OSPF-MDR in Single-Hop Broadcast Networks
RFC 5614 (OSPF-MDR) extends OSPF to support mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) by specifying its operation on the new OSPF interface of type MANET. This document describes the use of OSPF-MDR (MANET Designated Router) in a single-hop broadcast network, which is a special case of a MANET in which each router is a (one-hop) neighbor of each other router. Unlike an OSPF broadcast interface, such an interface can have a different cost associated with each neighbor. The document includes configuration recommendations and simplified mechanisms that can be used in single-hop broadcast networks.
RFC7137 - Use of the OSPF-MANET Interface in Single-Hop Broadcast Networks
This document describes the use of the OSPF-MANET interface in single-hop broadcast networks. It includes a mechanism to dynamically determine the presence of such a network and specific operational considerations due to its nature.
This document updates RFC 5820.
RFC7166 - Supporting Authentication Trailer for OSPFv3
Currently, OSPF for IPv6 (OSPFv3) uses IPsec as the only mechanism for authenticating protocol packets. This behavior is different from authentication mechanisms present in other routing protocols (OSPFv2, Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS), RIP, and Routing Information Protocol Next Generation (RIPng)). In some environments, it has been found that IPsec is difficult to configure and maintain and thus cannot be used. This document defines an alternative mechanism to authenticate OSPFv3 protocol packets so that OSPFv3 does not depend only upon IPsec for authentication.
The OSPFv3 Authentication Trailer was originally defined in RFC 6506. This document obsoletes RFC 6506 by providing a revised definition, including clarifications and refinements of the procedures.
RFC7471 - OSPF Traffic Engineering (TE) Metric Extensions
In certain networks, such as, but not limited to, financial information networks (e.g., stock market data providers), network performance information (e.g., link propagation delay) is becoming critical to data path selection.
This document describes common extensions to RFC 3630 "Traffic Engineering (TE) Extensions to OSPF Version 2" and RFC 5329 "Traffic Engineering Extensions to OSPF Version 3" to enable network performance information to be distributed in a scalable fashion. The information distributed using OSPF TE Metric Extensions can then be used to make path selection decisions based on network performance.
Note that this document only covers the mechanisms by which network performance information is distributed. The mechanisms for measuring network performance information or using that information, once distributed, are outside the scope of this document.
RFC7474 - Security Extension for OSPFv2 When Using Manual Key Management
The current OSPFv2 cryptographic authentication mechanism as defined in RFCs 2328 and 5709 is vulnerable to both inter-session and intra- session replay attacks when using manual keying. Additionally, the existing cryptographic authentication mechanism does not cover the IP header. This omission can be exploited to carry out various types of attacks.
This document defines changes to the authentication sequence number mechanism that will protect OSPFv2 from both inter-session and intra- session replay attacks when using manual keys for securing OSPFv2 protocol packets. Additionally, we also describe some changes in the cryptographic hash computation that will eliminate attacks resulting from OSPFv2 not protecting the IP header.
RFC7503 - OSPFv3 Autoconfiguration
OSPFv3 is a candidate for deployments in environments where autoconfiguration is a requirement. One such environment is the IPv6 home network where users expect to simply plug in a router and have it automatically use OSPFv3 for intra-domain routing. This document describes the necessary mechanisms for OSPFv3 to be self-configuring. This document updates RFC 5340 by relaxing the HelloInterval/ RouterDeadInterval checking during OSPFv3 adjacency formation and adding hysteresis to the update of self-originated Link State Advertisements (LSAs).
RFC7684 - OSPFv2 Prefix/Link Attribute Advertisement
OSPFv2 requires functional extension beyond what can readily be done with the fixed-format Link State Advertisements (LSAs) as described in RFC 2328. This document defines OSPFv2 Opaque LSAs based on Type-Length-Value (TLV) tuples that can be used to associate additional attributes with prefixes or links. Depending on the application, these prefixes and links may or may not be advertised in the fixed-format LSAs. The OSPFv2 Opaque LSAs are optional and fully backward compatible.
RFC7770 - Extensions to OSPF for Advertising Optional Router Capabilities
It is useful for routers in an OSPFv2 or OSPFv3 routing domain to know the capabilities of their neighbors and other routers in the routing domain. This document proposes extensions to OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 for advertising optional router capabilities. The Router Information (RI) Link State Advertisement (LSA) is defined for this purpose. In OSPFv2, the RI LSA will be implemented with an Opaque LSA type ID. In OSPFv3, the RI LSA will be implemented with a unique LSA type function code. In both protocols, the RI LSA can be advertised at any of the defined flooding scopes (link, area, or autonomous system (AS)). This document obsoletes RFC 4970 by providing a revised specification that includes support for advertisement of multiple instances of the RI LSA and a TLV for functional capabilities.
RFC7777 - Advertising Node Administrative Tags in OSPF
This document describes an extension to the OSPF protocol to add an optional operational capability that allows tagging and grouping of the nodes in an OSPF domain. This allows simplification, ease of management and control over route and path selection based on configured policies. This document describes an extension to the OSPF protocol to advertise node administrative tags. The node tags can be used to express and apply locally defined network policies, which are a very useful operational capability. Node tags may be used by either OSPF itself or other applications consuming information propagated via OSPF.
This document describes the protocol extensions to disseminate node administrative tags to the OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 protocol. It provides example use cases of administrative node tags.
RFC7884 - OSPF Extensions to Advertise Seamless Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (S-BFD) Target Discriminators
This document defines a new OSPF Router Information (RI) TLV that allows OSPF routers to flood the Seamless Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (S-BFD) Discriminator values associated with a target network identifier. This mechanism is applicable to both OSPFv2 and OSPFv3.
RFC7949 - OSPFv3 over IPv4 for IPv6 Transition
This document defines a mechanism to use IPv4 to transport OSPFv3 packets. Using OSPFv3 over IPv4 with the existing OSPFv3 Address Family extension can simplify transition from an OSPFv2 IPv4-only routing domain to an OSPFv3 dual-stack routing domain. This document updates RFC 5838 to support virtual links in the IPv4 unicast address family when using OSPFv3 over IPv4.
RFC8042 - OSPF Two-Part Metric
This document specifies an optional OSPF protocol extension to represent router metrics in a multi-access network in two parts: the metric from the router to the network and the metric from the network to the router. For such networks, the router-to-router metric for OSPF route computation is the sum of the two parts. This document updates RFC 2328.
RFC8099 - OSPF Topology-Transparent Zone
This document presents a Topology-Transparent Zone (TTZ) in an OSPF area. A TTZ comprises a group of routers and a number of links connecting these routers. Any router outside of the zone is not aware of the zone. A TTZ hides the internal topology of the TTZ from the outside. It does not directly advertise any internal information about the TTZ to a router outside of the TTZ. The information about the links and routers such as a link down inside the TTZ is not advertised to any router outside of the TTZ.