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RFC8476 - Signaling Maximum SID Depth (MSD) Using OSPF
This document defines a way for an Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) router to advertise multiple types of supported Maximum SID Depths (MSDs) at node and/or link granularity. Such advertisements allow entities (e.g., centralized controllers) to determine whether a particular Segment Identifier (SID) stack can be supported in a given network. This document only refers to the Signaling MSD as defined in RFC 8491, but it defines an encoding that can support other MSD types. Here, the term "OSPF" means both OSPFv2 and OSPFv3.
RFC8491 - Signaling Maximum SID Depth (MSD) Using IS-IS
This document defines a way for an Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) router to advertise multiple types of supported Maximum SID Depths (MSDs) at node and/or link granularity. Such advertisements allow entities (e.g., centralized controllers) to determine whether a particular Segment ID (SID) stack can be supported in a given network. This document only defines one type of MSD: Base MPLS Imposition. However, it defines an encoding that can support other MSD types. This document focuses on MSD use in a network that is Segment Routing (SR) enabled, but MSD may also be useful when SR is not enabled.
RFC8500 - IS-IS Routing with Reverse Metric
This document describes a mechanism to allow IS-IS routing to quickly and accurately shift traffic away from either a point-to-point or multi-access LAN interface during network maintenance or other operational events. This is accomplished by signaling adjacent IS-IS neighbors with a higher reverse metric, i.e., the metric towards the signaling IS-IS router.
RFC8510 - OSPF Link-Local Signaling (LLS) Extensions for Local Interface ID Advertisement
Every OSPF interface is assigned an Interface ID that uniquely identifies the interface on the router. In some cases, it is useful to know the assigned Interface ID on the remote side of the adjacency (Remote Interface ID).
This document describes the extensions to OSPF link-local signaling (LLS) to advertise the Local Interface ID.
RFC8570 - IS-IS Traffic Engineering (TE) Metric Extensions
In certain networks, such as, but not limited to, financial information networks (e.g., stock market data providers), network-performance criteria (e.g., latency) are becoming as critical to data-path selection as other metrics.
This document describes extensions to IS-IS Traffic Engineering Extensions (RFC 5305). These extensions provide a way to distribute and collect network-performance information in a scalable fashion. The information distributed using IS-IS TE Metric Extensions can then be used to make path-selection decisions based on network performance.
Note that this document only covers the mechanisms with which network-performance information is distributed. The mechanisms for measuring network performance or acting on that information, once distributed, are outside the scope of this document.
This document obsoletes RFC 7810.
RFC8666 - OSPFv3 Extensions for Segment Routing
Segment Routing (SR) allows a flexible definition of end-to-end paths within IGP topologies by encoding paths as sequences of topological subpaths called "segments". These segments are advertised by the link-state routing protocols (IS-IS and OSPF).
This document describes the OSPFv3 extensions required for Segment Routing with the MPLS data plane.
RFC8667 - IS-IS Extensions for Segment Routing
Segment Routing (SR) allows for a flexible definition of end-to-end paths within IGP topologies by encoding paths as sequences of topological sub-paths, called "segments". These segments are advertised by the link-state routing protocols (IS-IS and OSPF).
This document describes the IS-IS extensions that need to be introduced for Segment Routing operating on an MPLS data plane.
RFC8687 - OSPF Routing with Cross-Address Family Traffic Engineering Tunnels
When using Traffic Engineering (TE) in a dual-stack IPv4/IPv6 network, the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) TE Label Switched Path (LSP) infrastructure may be duplicated, even if the destination IPv4 and IPv6 addresses belong to the same remote router. In order to achieve an integrated MPLS TE LSP infrastructure, OSPF routes must be computed over MPLS TE tunnels created using information propagated in another OSPF instance. This issue is solved by advertising cross-address family (X-AF) OSPF TE information.
This document describes an update to RFC 5786 that allows for the easy identification of a router's local X-AF IP addresses.
RFC8706 - Restart Signaling for IS-IS
This document describes a mechanism for a restarting router to signal to its neighbors that it is restarting, allowing them to reestablish their adjacencies without cycling through the DOWN state while still correctly initiating database synchronization.
This document additionally describes a mechanism for a router to signal its neighbors that it is preparing to initiate a restart while maintaining forwarding-plane state. This allows the neighbors to maintain their adjacencies until the router has restarted but also allows the neighbors to bring the adjacencies down in the event of other topology changes.
This document additionally describes a mechanism for a restarting router to determine when it has achieved Link State Protocol Data Unit (LSP) database synchronization with its neighbors and a mechanism to optimize LSP database synchronization while minimizing transient routing disruption when a router starts.
This document obsoletes RFC 5306.
RFC8770 - Host Router Support for OSPFv2
The Open Shortest Path First Version 2 (OSPFv2) protocol does not have a mechanism for a node to repel transit traffic if it is on the shortest path. This document defines a bit called the Host-bit (H-bit). This bit enables a router to advertise that it is a non-transit router. This document also describes the changes needed to support the H-bit in the domain. In addition, this document updates RFC 6987 to advertise Type 2 External and Not-So-Stubby Area (NSSA) Link State Advertisements (LSAs) (RFC 3101) with a high cost in order to repel traffic effectively.
RFC8918 - Invalid TLV Handling in IS-IS
The key to the extensibility of the Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) protocol has been the handling of unsupported and/or invalid Type-Length-Value (TLV) tuples. Although there are explicit statements in existing specifications, deployment experience has shown that there are inconsistencies in the behavior when a TLV that is disallowed in a particular Protocol Data Unit (PDU) is received.
This document discusses such cases and makes the correct behavior explicit in order to ensure that interoperability is maximized.
This document updates RFCs 5305 and 6232.
RFC8919 - IS-IS Application-Specific Link Attributes
Existing traffic-engineering-related link attribute advertisements have been defined and are used in RSVP-TE deployments. Since the original RSVP-TE use case was defined, additional applications (e.g., Segment Routing Policy and Loop-Free Alternates) that also make use of the link attribute advertisements have been defined. In cases where multiple applications wish to make use of these link attributes, the current advertisements do not support application-specific values for a given attribute, nor do they support indication of which applications are using the advertised value for a given link. This document introduces new link attribute advertisements that address both of these shortcomings.
RFC8920 - OSPF Application-Specific Link Attributes
Existing traffic-engineering-related link attribute advertisements have been defined and are used in RSVP-TE deployments. Since the original RSVP-TE use case was defined, additional applications (e.g., Segment Routing Policy and Loop-Free Alternates) that also make use of the link attribute advertisements have been defined. In cases where multiple applications wish to make use of these link attributes, the current advertisements do not support application-specific values for a given attribute, nor do they support indication of which applications are using the advertised value for a given link. This document introduces new link attribute advertisements in OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 that address both of these shortcomings.