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RFC3471 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description
This document describes extensions to Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) signaling required to support Generalized MPLS. Generalized MPLS extends the MPLS control plane to encompass time-division (e.g., Synchronous Optical Network and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy, SONET/SDH), wavelength (optical lambdas) and spatial switching (e.g., incoming port or fiber to outgoing port or fiber). This document presents a functional description of the extensions. Protocol specific formats and mechanisms, and technology specific details are specified in separate documents. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3472 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Constraint-based Routed Label Distribution Protocol (CR-LDP) Extensions
This document describes extensions to Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Constraint-based Routed Label Distribution Protocol (CR-LDP) signaling required to support Generalized MPLS. Generalized MPLS extends the MPLS control plane to encompass time-division (e.g., Synchronous Optical Network and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy, SONET/SDH), wavelength (optical lambdas) and spatial switching (e.g., incoming port or fiber to outgoing port or fiber). This document presents a CR-LDP specific description of the extensions. A generic functional description can be found in separate documents. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3473 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions
This document describes extensions to Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Resource ReserVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling required to support Generalized MPLS. Generalized MPLS extends the MPLS control plane to encompass time-division (e.g., Synchronous Optical Network and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy, SONET/SDH), wavelength (optical lambdas) and spatial switching (e.g., incoming port or fiber to outgoing port or fiber). This document presents a RSVP-TE specific description of the extensions. A generic functional description can be found in separate documents. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3609 - Tracing Requirements for Generic Tunnels
This document specifies requirements for a generic route-tracing application. It also specifies requirements for a protocol that will support that application. Network operators will use the generic route-tracing application to verify proper operation of the IP forwarding plane. They will also use the application to discover details regarding tunnels that support IP forwarding. The generic route-tracing application, specified herein, supports a superset of the functionality that "traceroute" currently offers. Like traceroute, the generic route-tracing application can discover the forwarding path between two interfaces that are contained by an IP network. Unlike traceroute, this application can reveal details regarding tunnels that support the IP forwarding path.
RFC3945 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Architecture
Future data and transmission networks will consist of elements such as routers, switches, Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) systems, Add-Drop Multiplexors (ADMs), photonic cross-connects (PXCs), optical cross-connects (OXCs), etc. that will use Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) to dynamically provision resources and to provide network survivability using protection and restoration techniques.
This document describes the architecture of GMPLS. GMPLS extends MPLS to encompass time-division (e.g., SONET/SDH, PDH, G.709), wavelength (lambdas), and spatial switching (e.g., incoming port or fiber to outgoing port or fiber). The focus of GMPLS is on the control plane of these various layers since each of them can use physically diverse data or forwarding planes. The intention is to cover both the signaling and the routing part of that control plane. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3946 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Extensions for Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) Control
This document is a companion to the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) signaling. It defines the Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) technology specific information needed when using GMPLS signaling. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4003 - GMPLS Signaling Procedure for Egress Control
This document clarifies the procedures for the control of the label used on an output/downstream interface of the egress node of a Label Switched Path (LSP). This control is also known as "Egress Control". Support for Egress Control is implicit in Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling. This document clarifies the specification of GMPLS Signaling and does not modify GMPLS signaling mechanisms and procedures. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4139 - Requirements for Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Signaling Usage and Extensions for Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON)
The Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) suite of protocols has been defined to control different switching technologies and different applications. These include support for requesting Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) connections, including Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) and Optical Transport Networks (OTNs).
This document concentrates on the signaling aspects of the GMPLS suite of protocols. It identifies the features to be covered by the GMPLS signaling protocol to support the capabilities of an Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON). This document provides a problem statement and additional requirements for the GMPLS signaling protocol to support the ASON functionality. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4202 - Routing Extensions in Support of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
This document specifies routing extensions in support of carrying link state information for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS). This document enhances the routing extensions required to support MPLS Traffic Engineering (TE). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4203 - OSPF Extensions in Support of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
This document specifies encoding of extensions to the OSPF routing protocol in support of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4204 - Link Management Protocol (LMP)
For scalability purposes, multiple data links can be combined to form a single traffic engineering (TE) link. Furthermore, the management of TE links is not restricted to in-band messaging, but instead can be done using out-of-band techniques. This document specifies a link management protocol (LMP) that runs between a pair of nodes and is used to manage TE links. Specifically, LMP will be used to maintain control channel connectivity, verify the physical connectivity of the data links, correlate the link property information, suppress downstream alarms, and localize link failures for protection/restoration purposes in multiple kinds of networks. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4207 - Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) Encoding for Link Management Protocol (LMP) Test Messages
This document details the Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) technology-specific information needed when sending Link Management Protocol (LMP) test messages. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4208 - Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) User-Network Interface (UNI): Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Support for the Overlay Model
Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) defines both routing and signaling protocols for the creation of Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in various switching technologies. These protocols can be used to support a number of deployment scenarios. This memo addresses the application of GMPLS to the overlay model. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4209 - Link Management Protocol (LMP) for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) Optical Line Systems
The Link Management Protocol (LMP) is defined to manage traffic engineering (TE) links. In its present form, LMP focuses on peer nodes, i.e., nodes that peer in signaling and/or routing. This document proposes extensions to LMP to allow it to be used between a peer node and an adjacent optical line system (OLS). These extensions are intended to satisfy the "Optical Link Interface Requirements" described in a companion document. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4257 - Framework for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based Control of Synchronous Digital Hierarchy/Synchronous Optical Networking (SDH/SONET) Networks
Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) is a suite of protocol extensions to MPLS to make it generally applicable, to include, for example, control of non packet-based switching, and particularly, optical switching. One consideration is to use GMPLS protocols to upgrade the control plane of optical transport networks. This document illustrates this process by describing those extensions to GMPLS protocols that are aimed at controlling Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) or Synchronous Optical Networking (SONET) networks. SDH/SONET networks make good examples of this process for a variety of reasons. This document highlights extensions to GMPLS-related routing protocols to disseminate information needed in transport path computation and network operations, together with (G)MPLS protocol extensions required for the provisioning of transport circuits. New capabilities that an GMPLS control plane would bring to SDH/SONET networks, such as new restoration methods and multi-layer circuit establishment, are also discussed. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4258 - Requirements for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Routing for the Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON)
The Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) suite of protocols has been defined to control different switching technologies as well as different applications. These include support for requesting Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) connections including Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) and Optical Transport Networks (OTNs).
This document concentrates on the routing requirements placed on the GMPLS suite of protocols in order to support the capabilities and functionalities of an Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON) as defined by the ITU-T. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4327 - Link Management Protocol (LMP) Management Information Base (MIB)
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for modeling the Link Management Protocol (LMP). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4328 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Extensions for G.709 Optical Transport Networks Control
This document is a companion to the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) signaling documents. It describes the technology-specific information needed to extend GMPLS signaling to control Optical Transport Networks (OTN); it also includes the so-called pre-OTN developments. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4394 - A Transport Network View of the Link Management Protocol (LMP)
The Link Management Protocol (LMP) has been developed as part of the Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) protocol suite to manage Traffic Engineering (TE) resources and links. The GMPLS control plane (routing and signaling) uses TE links for establishing Label Switched Paths (LSPs). This memo describes the relationship of the LMP procedures to 'discovery' as defined in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU-T), and ongoing ITU-T work. This document provides an overview of LMP in the context of the ITU-T Automatically Switched Optical Networks (ASON) and transport network terminology and relates it to the ITU-T discovery work to promote a common understanding for progressing the work of IETF and ITU-T. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4397 - A Lexicography for the Interpretation of Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Terminology within the Context of the ITU-T's Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON) Architecture
Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) has been developed by the IETF to facilitate the establishment of Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in a variety of data plane technologies and across several architectural models. The ITU-T has specified an architecture for the control of Automatically Switched Optical Networks (ASON).
This document provides a lexicography for the interpretation of GMPLS terminology within the context of the ASON architecture.
It is important to note that GMPLS is applicable in a wider set of contexts than just ASON. The definitions presented in this document do not provide exclusive or complete interpretations of GMPLS concepts. This document simply allows the GMPLS terms to be applied within the ASON context. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4426 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Recovery Functional Specification
This document presents a functional description of the protocol extensions needed to support Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based recovery (i.e., protection and restoration). Protocol specific formats and mechanisms will be described in companion documents. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4427 - Recovery (Protection and Restoration) Terminology for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
This document defines a common terminology for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based recovery mechanisms (i.e., protection and restoration). The terminology is independent of the underlying transport technologies covered by GMPLS. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4428 - Analysis of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based Recovery Mechanisms (including Protection and Restoration)
This document provides an analysis grid to evaluate, compare, and contrast the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocol suite capabilities with the recovery mechanisms currently proposed at the IETF CCAMP Working Group. A detailed analysis of each of the recovery phases is provided using the terminology defined in RFC 4427. This document focuses on transport plane survivability and recovery issues and not on control plane resilience and related aspects. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4558 - Node-ID Based Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Hello: A Clarification Statement
Use of Node-ID based Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Hello messages is implied in a number of cases, e.g., when data and control planes are separated, when TE links are unnumbered. Furthermore, when link level failure detection is performed by some means other than exchanging RSVP Hello messages, use of a Node-ID based Hello session is optimal for detecting signaling adjacency failure for Resource reSerVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE). Nonetheless, this implied behavior is unclear, and this document formalizes use of the Node-ID based RSVP Hello session in some scenarios. The procedure described in this document applies to both Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) capable nodes. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4606 - Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Extensions for Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) Control
This document provides minor clarification to RFC 3946.
This document is a companion to the Generalized Multi-protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) signaling. It defines the Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) technology-specific information needed when GMPLS signaling is used. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4631 - Link Management Protocol (LMP) Management Information Base (MIB)
This document provides minor corrections to and obsoletes RFC 4327.
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for modeling the Link Management Protocol (LMP). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4652 - Evaluation of Existing Routing Protocols against Automatic Switched Optical Network (ASON) Routing Requirements
The Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) suite of protocols has been defined to control different switching technologies as well as different applications. These include support for requesting TDM connections including Synchronous Optical Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) and Optical Transport Networks (OTNs).
This document provides an evaluation of the IETF Routing Protocols against the routing requirements for an Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON) as defined by ITU-T. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4726 - A Framework for Inter-Domain Multiprotocol Label Switching Traffic Engineering
This document provides a framework for establishing and controlling Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineered (TE) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in multi-domain networks.
For the purposes of this document, a domain is considered to be any collection of network elements within a common sphere of address management or path computational responsibility. Examples of such domains include Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) areas and Autonomous Systems (ASes). This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4736 - Reoptimization of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) Loosely Routed Label Switched Path (LSP)
This document defines a mechanism for the reoptimization of loosely routed MPLS and GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching) Traffic Engineering (TE) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) signaled with Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE). This document proposes a mechanism that allows a TE LSP head-end Label Switching Router (LSR) to trigger a new path re-evaluation on every hop that has a next hop defined as a loose or abstract hop and a mid-point LSR to signal to the head-end LSR that a better path exists (compared to the current path) or that the TE LSP must be reoptimized (because of maintenance required on the TE LSP path). The proposed mechanism applies to the cases of intra- and inter-domain (Interior Gateway Protocol area (IGP area) or Autonomous System) packet and non-packet TE LSPs following a loosely routed path. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4783 - GMPLS - Communication of Alarm Information
This document describes an extension to Generalized MPLS (Multi-Protocol Label Switching) signaling to support communication of alarm information. GMPLS signaling already supports the control of alarm reporting, but not the communication of alarm information. This document presents both a functional description and GMPLS-RSVP specifics of such an extension. This document also proposes modification of the RSVP ERROR_SPEC object.
This document updates RFC 3473, "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions", through the addition of new, optional protocol elements. It does not change, and is fully backward compatible with, the procedures specified in RFC 3473. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4801 - Definitions of Textual Conventions for Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Management
This document defines a Management Information Base (MIB) module that contains textual conventions (TCs) to represent commonly used Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) management information. The intent is that these textual conventions will be imported and used in GMPLS-related MIB modules that would otherwise define their own representations. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4802 - Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Traffic Engineering Management Information Base
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based traffic engineering. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4803 - Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Label Switching Router (LSR) Management Information Base
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects to configure and/or monitor a Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Label Switching Router (LSR). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4872 - RSVP-TE Extensions in Support of End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Recovery
This document describes protocol-specific procedures and extensions for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Resource ReSerVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling to support end-to-end Label Switched Path (LSP) recovery that denotes protection and restoration. A generic functional description of GMPLS recovery can be found in a companion document, RFC 4426. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4873 - GMPLS Segment Recovery
This document describes protocol specific procedures for GMPLS (Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching) RSVP-TE (Resource ReserVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering) signaling extensions to support label switched path (LSP) segment protection and restoration. These extensions are intended to complement and be consistent with the RSVP-TE Extensions for End-to-End GMPLS Recovery (RFC 4872). Implications and interactions with fast reroute are also addressed. This document also updates the handling of NOTIFY_REQUEST objects. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4874 - Exclude Routes - Extension to Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE)
This document specifies ways to communicate route exclusions during path setup using Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE).
The RSVP-TE specification, "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels" (RFC 3209) and GMPLS extensions to RSVP-TE, "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions" (RFC 3473) allow abstract nodes and resources to be explicitly included in a path setup, but not to be explicitly excluded.
In some networks where precise explicit paths are not computed at the head end, it may be useful to specify and signal abstract nodes and resources that are to be explicitly excluded from routes. These exclusions may apply to the whole path, or to parts of a path between two abstract nodes specified in an explicit path. How Shared Risk Link Groups (SRLGs) can be excluded is also specified in this document. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4920 - Crankback Signaling Extensions for MPLS and GMPLS RSVP-TE
In a distributed, constraint-based routing environment, the information used to compute a path may be out of date. This means that Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineered (TE) Label Switched Path (LSP) setup requests may be blocked by links or nodes without sufficient resources. Crankback is a scheme whereby setup failure information is returned from the point of failure to allow new setup attempts to be made avoiding the blocked resources. Crankback can also be applied to LSP recovery to indicate the location of the failed link or node.
This document specifies crankback signaling extensions for use in MPLS signaling using RSVP-TE as defined in "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels", RFC 3209, and GMPLS signaling as defined in "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description", RFC 3473. These extensions mean that the LSP setup request can be retried on an alternate path that detours around blocked links or nodes. This offers significant improvements in the successful setup and recovery ratios for LSPs, especially in situations where a large number of setup requests are triggered at the same time. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4972 - Routing Extensions for Discovery of Multiprotocol (MPLS) Label Switch Router (LSR) Traffic Engineering (TE) Mesh Membership
The setup of a full mesh of Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) Label Switched Paths (LSP) among a set of Label Switch Routers (LSR) is a common deployment scenario of MPLS Traffic Engineering either for bandwidth optimization, bandwidth guarantees or fast rerouting with MPLS Fast Reroute. Such deployment may require the configuration of a potentially large number of TE LSPs (on the order of the square of the number of LSRs). This document specifies Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing extensions for Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) so as to provide an automatic discovery of the set of LSRs members of a mesh in order to automate the creation of such mesh of TE LSPs. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4974 - Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) RSVP-TE Signaling Extensions in Support of Calls
In certain networking topologies, it may be advantageous to maintain associations between endpoints and key transit points to support an instance of a service. Such associations are known as Calls.
A Call does not provide the actual connectivity for transmitting user traffic, but only builds a relationship by which subsequent Connections may be made. In Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) such Connections are known as Label Switched Paths (LSPs).
This document specifies how GMPLS Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling may be used and extended to support Calls. These mechanisms provide full and logical Call/Connection separation.
The mechanisms proposed in this document are applicable to any environment (including multi-area), and for any type of interface: packet, layer-2, time-division multiplexed, lambda, or fiber switching. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4990 - Use of Addresses in Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Networks
This document clarifies the use of addresses in Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) networks. The aim is to facilitate interworking of GMPLS-capable Label Switching Routers (LSRs). The document is based on experience gained in implementation, interoperability testing, and deployment.
The document describes how to interpret address and identifier fields within GMPLS protocols, and how to choose which addresses to set in those fields for specific control plane usage models. It also discusses how to handle IPv6 sources and destinations in the MPLS and GMPLS Traffic Engineering (TE) Management Information Base (MIB) modules.
This document does not define new procedures or processes. Whenever this document makes requirements statements or recommendations, these are taken from normative text in the referenced RFCs. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5063 - Extensions to GMPLS Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Graceful Restart
This document describes extensions to the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Graceful Restart mechanisms defined in RFC 3473. The extensions enable the recovery of RSVP signaling state based on the Path message last sent by the node being restarted.
Previously defined Graceful Restart mechanisms, also called recovery from nodal faults, permit recovery of signaling state from adjacent nodes when the data plane has retained the associated forwarding state across a restart. Those mechanisms do not fully support signaling state recovery on ingress nodes or recovery of all RSVP objects.
The extensions defined in this document build on the RSVP Hello extensions defined in RFC 3209, and extensions for state recovery on nodal faults defined in RFC 3473. Using these extensions, the restarting node can recover all previously transmitted Path state, including the Explicit Route Object and the downstream (outgoing) interface identifiers. The extensions can also be used to recover signaling state after the restart of an ingress node.
These extensions are not used to create or restore data plane state.
The extensions optionally support the use of Summary Refresh, defined in RFC 2961, to reduce the number of messages exchanged during the Recovery Phase when the restarting node has recovered signaling state locally for one or more Label Switched Paths (LSPs). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5073 - IGP Routing Protocol Extensions for Discovery of Traffic Engineering Node Capabilities
It is highly desired, in several cases, to take into account Traffic Engineering (TE) node capabilities during Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineered Label Switched Path (TE-LSP) selection, such as, for instance, the capability to act as a branch Label Switching Router (LSR) of a Point-To-MultiPoint (P2MP) LSP. This requires advertising these capabilities within the Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP). For that purpose, this document specifies Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and Intermediate System-Intermediate System (IS-IS) traffic engineering extensions for the advertisement of control plane and data plane traffic engineering node capabilities. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5145 - Framework for MPLS-TE to GMPLS Migration
The migration from Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) to Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) is the process of evolving an MPLS-TE control plane to a GMPLS control plane. An appropriate migration strategy will be selected based on various factors including the service provider's network deployment plan, customer demand, and operational policy.
This document presents several migration models and strategies for migrating from MPLS-TE to GMPLS. In the course of migration, MPLS-TE and GMPLS devices, or networks, may coexist that may require interworking between MPLS-TE and GMPLS protocols. Aspects of the required interworking are discussed as it will influence the choice of a migration strategy. This framework document provides a migration toolkit to aid the operator in selection of an appropriate strategy.
This framework document also lists a set of solutions that may aid in interworking, and highlights a set of potential issues. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5146 - Interworking Requirements to Support Operation of MPLS-TE over GMPLS Networks
Operation of a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering (TE) network as a client network to a Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) network has enhanced operational capabilities compared to those provided by a coexistent protocol model (i.e., operation of MPLS-TE over an independently managed transport layer).
The GMPLS network may be a packet or a non-packet network, and may itself be a multi-layer network supporting both packet and non-packet technologies. An MPLS-TE Label Switched Path (LSP) originates and terminates on an MPLS Label Switching Router (LSR). The GMPLS network provides transparent transport for the end-to-end MPLS-TE LSP.
This document describes a framework and Service Provider requirements for operating MPLS-TE networks over GMPLS networks. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5150 - Label Switched Path Stitching with Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching Traffic Engineering (GMPLS TE)
In certain scenarios, there may be a need to combine several Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) such that a single end-to-end (e2e) LSP is realized and all traffic from one constituent LSP is switched onto the next LSP. We will refer to this as "LSP stitching", the key requirement being that a constituent LSP not be allocated to more than one e2e LSP. The constituent LSPs will be referred to as "LSP segments" (S-LSPs).
This document describes extensions to the existing GMPLS signaling protocol (Resource Reservation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE)) to establish e2e LSPs created from S-LSPs, and describes how the LSPs can be managed using the GMPLS signaling and routing protocols.
It may be possible to configure a GMPLS node to switch the traffic from an LSP for which it is the egress, to another LSP for which it is the ingress, without requiring any signaling or routing extensions whatsoever and such that the operation is completely transparent to other nodes. This will also result in LSP stitching in the data plane. However, this document does not cover this scenario of LSP stitching. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5151 - Inter-Domain MPLS and GMPLS Traffic Engineering -- Resource Reservation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions
This document describes procedures and protocol extensions for the use of Resource Reservation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling in Multiprotocol Label Switching-Traffic Engineering (MPLS-TE) packet networks and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) packet and non-packet networks to support the establishment and maintenance of Label Switched Paths that cross domain boundaries.
For the purpose of this document, a domain is considered to be any collection of network elements within a common realm of address space or path computation responsibility. Examples of such domains include Autonomous Systems, Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing areas, and GMPLS overlay networks. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5152 - A Per-Domain Path Computation Method for Establishing Inter-Domain Traffic Engineering (TE) Label Switched Paths (LSPs)
This document specifies a per-domain path computation technique for establishing inter-domain Traffic Engineering (TE) Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Label Switched Paths (LSPs). In this document, a domain refers to a collection of network elements within a common sphere of address management or path computational responsibility such as Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) areas and Autonomous Systems.
Per-domain computation applies where the full path of an inter-domain TE LSP cannot be or is not determined at the ingress node of the TE LSP, and is not signaled across domain boundaries. This is most likely to arise owing to TE visibility limitations. The signaling message indicates the destination and nodes up to the next domain boundary. It may also indicate further domain boundaries or domain identifiers. The path through each domain, possibly including the choice of exit point from the domain, must be determined within the domain. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5212 - Requirements for GMPLS-Based Multi-Region and Multi-Layer Networks (MRN/MLN)
Most of the initial efforts to utilize Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) have been related to environments hosting devices with a single switching capability. The complexity raised by the control of such data planes is similar to that seen in classical IP/MPLS networks. By extending MPLS to support multiple switching technologies, GMPLS provides a comprehensive framework for the control of a multi-layered network of either a single switching technology or multiple switching technologies.
In GMPLS, a switching technology domain defines a region, and a network of multiple switching types is referred to in this document as a multi-region network (MRN). When referring in general to a layered network, which may consist of either single or multiple regions, this document uses the term multi-layer network (MLN). This document defines a framework for GMPLS based multi-region / multi-layer networks and lists a set of functional requirements. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5298 - Analysis of Inter-Domain Label Switched Path (LSP) Recovery
Protection and recovery are important features of service offerings in Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) networks. Increasingly, MPLS and GMPLS networks are being extended from single domain scope to multi-domain environments.
Various schemes and processes have been developed to establish Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in multi-domain environments. These are discussed in RFC 4726: "A Framework for Inter-Domain Multiprotocol Label Switching Traffic Engineering".
This document analyzes the application of these techniques to protection and recovery in multi-domain networks. The main focus for this document is on establishing end-to-end diverse Traffic Engineering (TE) LSPs in multi-domain networks. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5316 - ISIS Extensions in Support of Inter-Autonomous System (AS) MPLS and GMPLS Traffic Engineering
This document describes extensions to the ISIS (ISIS) protocol to support Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) for multiple Autonomous Systems (ASes). It defines ISIS-TE extensions for the flooding of TE information about inter-AS links, which can be used to perform inter- AS TE path computation.
No support for flooding information from within one AS to another AS is proposed or defined in this document. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5339 - Evaluation of Existing GMPLS Protocols against Multi-Layer and Multi-Region Networks (MLN/MRN)
This document provides an evaluation of Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocols and mechanisms against the requirements for Multi-Layer Networks (MLNs) and Multi-Region Networks (MRNs). In addition, this document identifies areas where additional protocol extensions or procedures are needed to satisfy these requirements, and provides guidelines for potential extensions. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5392 - OSPF Extensions in Support of Inter-Autonomous System (AS) MPLS and GMPLS Traffic Engineering
This document describes extensions to the OSPF version 2 and 3 protocols to support Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) for multiple Autonomous Systems (ASes). OSPF-TE v2 and v3 extensions are defined for the flooding of TE information about inter-AS links that can be used to perform inter-AS TE path computation.
No support for flooding information from within one AS to another AS is proposed or defined in this document. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5420 - Encoding of Attributes for MPLS LSP Establishment Using Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE)
Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) may be established using the Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) extensions. This protocol includes an object (the SESSION_ATTRIBUTE object) that carries a Flags field used to indicate options and attributes of the LSP. That Flags field has eight bits, allowing for eight options to be set. Recent proposals in many documents that extend RSVP-TE have suggested uses for each of the previously unused bits.
This document defines a new object for RSVP-TE messages that allows the signaling of further attribute bits and also the carriage of arbitrary attribute parameters to make RSVP-TE easily extensible to support new requirements. Additionally, this document defines a way to record the attributes applied to the LSP on a hop-by-hop basis.
The object mechanisms defined in this document are equally applicable to Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Packet Switch Capable (PSC) LSPs and to GMPLS non-PSC LSPs.
This document replaces and obsoletes the previous version of this work, published as RFC 4420. The only change is in the encoding of the Type-Length-Variable (TLV) data structures. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5467 - GMPLS Asymmetric Bandwidth Bidirectional Label Switched Paths (LSPs)
This document defines a method for the support of GMPLS asymmetric bandwidth bidirectional Label Switched Paths (LSPs). The presented approach is applicable to any switching technology and builds on the original Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) model for the transport of traffic-related parameters. The procedures described in this document are experimental. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5493 - Requirements for the Conversion between Permanent Connections and Switched Connections in a Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Network
From a carrier perspective, the possibility of turning a permanent connection (PC) into a soft permanent connection (SPC) and vice versa, without actually affecting data plane traffic being carried over it, is a valuable option. In other terms, such operation can be seen as a way of transferring the ownership and control of an existing and in-use data plane connection between the management plane and the control plane, leaving its data plane state untouched.
This memo sets out the requirements for such procedures within a Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) network. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5495 - Description of the Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic-Engineered (RSVP-TE) Graceful Restart Procedures
The Hello message for the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) has been defined to establish and maintain basic signaling node adjacencies for Label Switching Routers (LSRs) participating in a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic-engineered (TE) network. The Hello message has been extended for use in Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) networks for state recovery of control channel or nodal faults.
The GMPLS protocol definitions for RSVP also allow a restarting node to learn which label it previously allocated for use on a Label Switched Path (LSP).
Further RSVP protocol extensions have been defined to enable a restarting node to recover full control plane state by exchanging RSVP messages with its upstream and downstream neighbors.
This document provides an informational clarification of the control plane procedures for a GMPLS network when there are multiple node failures, and describes how full control plane state can be recovered in different scenarios where the order in which the nodes restart is different.
This document does not define any new processes or procedures. All protocol mechanisms are already defined in the referenced documents. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5553 - Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Extensions for Path Key Support
The paths taken by Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) may be computed by Path Computation Elements (PCEs). Where the TE LSP crosses multiple domains, such as Autonomous Systems (ASes), the path may be computed by multiple PCEs that cooperate, with each responsible for computing a segment of the path.
To preserve confidentiality of topology within each AS, the PCEs support a mechanism to hide the contents of a segment of a path (such as the segment of the path that traverses an AS), called the Confidential Path Segment (CPS), by encoding the contents as a Path Key Subobject (PKS) and embedding this subobject within the result of its path computation.
This document describes how to carry Path Key Subobjects in the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Explicit Route Objects (EROs) and Record Route Objects (RROs) so as to facilitate confidentiality in the signaling of inter-domain TE LSPs. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5787 - OSPFv2 Routing Protocols Extensions for Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON) Routing
The ITU-T has defined an architecture and requirements for operating an Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON).
The Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocol suite is designed to provide a control plane for a range of network technologies including optical networks such as time division multiplexing (TDM) networks including SONET/SDH and Optical Transport Networks (OTNs), and lambda switching optical networks.
The requirements for GMPLS routing to satisfy the requirements of ASON routing, and an evaluation of existing GMPLS routing protocols are provided in other documents. This document defines extensions to the OSPFv2 Link State Routing Protocol to meet the requirements for routing in an ASON.
Note that this work is scoped to the requirements and evaluation expressed in RFC 4258 and RFC 4652 and the ITU-T Recommendations current when those documents were written. Future extensions of revisions of this work may be necessary if the ITU-T Recommendations are revised or if new requirements are introduced into a revision of RFC 4258. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5814 - Label Switched Path (LSP) Dynamic Provisioning Performance Metrics in Generalized MPLS Networks
Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) is one of the most promising candidate technologies for a future data transmission network. GMPLS has been developed to control and operate different kinds of network elements, such as conventional routers, switches, Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) systems, Add-Drop Multiplexers (ADMs), photonic cross-connects (PXCs), optical cross- connects (OXCs), etc. These physically diverse devices differ drastically from one another in dynamic provisioning ability. At the same time, the need for dynamically provisioned connections is increasing because optical networks are being deployed in metro areas. As different applications have varied requirements in the provisioning performance of optical networks, it is imperative to define standardized metrics and procedures such that the performance of networks and application needs can be mapped to each other.
This document provides a series of performance metrics to evaluate the dynamic Label Switched Path (LSP) provisioning performance in GMPLS networks, specifically the dynamic LSP setup/release performance. These metrics can be used to characterize the features of GMPLS networks in LSP dynamic provisioning. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5817 - Graceful Shutdown in MPLS and Generalized MPLS Traffic Engineering Networks
MPLS-TE Graceful Shutdown is a method for explicitly notifying the nodes in a Traffic Engineering (TE) enabled network that the TE capability on a link or on an entire Label Switching Router (LSR) is going to be disabled. MPLS-TE graceful shutdown mechanisms are tailored toward addressing planned outage in the network.
This document provides requirements and protocol mechanisms to reduce or eliminate traffic disruption in the event of a planned shutdown of a network resource. These operations are equally applicable to both MPLS-TE and its Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) extensions. This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC5818 - Data Channel Status Confirmation Extensions for the Link Management Protocol
This document defines simple additions to the Link Management Protocol (LMP) to provide a control plane tool that can assist in the location of stranded resources by allowing adjacent Label-Switching Routers (LSRs) to confirm data channel statuses and provide triggers for notifying the management plane if any discrepancies are found. As LMP is already used to verify data plane connectivity, it is considered to be an appropriate candidate to support this feature. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5828 - Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Ethernet Label Switching Architecture and Framework
There has been significant recent work in increasing the capabilities of Ethernet switches and Ethernet forwarding models. As a consequence, the role of Ethernet is rapidly expanding into "transport networks" that previously were the domain of other technologies such as Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) / Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH), Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM), and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). This document defines an architecture and framework for a Generalized- MPLS-based control plane for Ethernet in this "transport network" capacity. GMPLS has already been specified for similar technologies. Some additional extensions to the GMPLS control plane are needed, and this document provides a framework for these extensions. This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC5852 - RSVP-TE Signaling Extension for LSP Handover from the Management Plane to the Control Plane in a GMPLS-Enabled Transport Network
In a transport network scenario, Data Plane connections controlled by either a Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Control Plane (Soft Permanent Connections - SPC) or a Management System (Permanent Connections - PC) may independently coexist. The ability of transforming an existing PC into an SPC and vice versa -- without actually affecting Data Plane traffic being carried over it -- is a requirement. The requirements for the conversion between permanent connections and switched connections in a GMPLS Network are defined in RFC 5493.
This memo describes an extension to GMPLS Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling that enables the transfer of connection ownership between the Management and the Control Planes. Such a transfer is referred to as a Handover. This document defines all Handover-related procedures. This includes the handling of failure conditions and subsequent reversion to original state. A basic premise of the extension is that the Handover procedures must never impact an already established Data Plane connection. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6001 - Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Protocol Extensions for Multi-Layer and Multi-Region Networks (MLN/MRN)
There are specific requirements for the support of networks comprising Label Switching Routers (LSRs) participating in different data plane switching layers controlled by a single Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) control plane instance, referred to as GMPLS Multi-Layer Networks / Multi-Region Networks (MLN/MRN).
This document defines extensions to GMPLS routing and signaling protocols so as to support the operation of GMPLS Multi-Layer / Multi-Region Networks. It covers the elements of a single GMPLS control plane instance controlling multiple Label Switched Path (LSP) regions or layers within a single Traffic Engineering (TE) domain. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6002 - Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Data Channel Switching Capable (DCSC) and Channel Set Label Extensions
This document describes two technology-independent extensions to Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS). The first extension defines the new switching type Data Channel Switching Capable. Data Channel Switching Capable interfaces are able to support switching of the whole digital channel presented on single channel interfaces. The second extension defines a new type of generalized label and updates related objects. The new label is called the Generalized Channel_Set Label and allows more than one data plane label to be controlled as part of a Label Switched Path (LSP). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6003 - Ethernet Traffic Parameters
This document describes the support of Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) Ethernet traffic parameters as described in MEF10.1 when using Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Resource ReSerVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6004 - Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Support for Metro Ethernet Forum and G.8011 Ethernet Service Switching
RFC6005 - Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Support for Metro Ethernet Forum and G.8011 User Network Interface (UNI)
This document describes a method for controlling two specific types of Ethernet switching via a GMPLS-based User Network Interface (UNI). This document supports the types of switching required by the Ethernet services that have been defined in the context of the Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) and International Telecommunication Union (ITU) G.8011. This document is the UNI companion to "Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) Support for Metro Ethernet Forum and G.8011 Ethernet Service Switching". This document does not define or limit the underlying intra-domain or Internal NNI (I-NNI) technology used to support the UNI. [STANDARDS- TRACK]
RFC6060 - Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Control of Ethernet Provider Backbone Traffic Engineering (PBB-TE)
This specification is complementary to the GMPLS Ethernet Label Switching Architecture and Framework and describes the technology-specific aspects of GMPLS control for Provider Backbone Bridge Traffic Engineering (PBB-TE). The necessary GMPLS extensions and mechanisms are described to establish Ethernet PBB-TE point-to-point (P2P) and point-to-multipoint (P2MP) connections. This document supports, but does not modify, the standard IEEE data plane. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6107 - Procedures for Dynamically Signaled Hierarchical Label Switched Paths
Label Switched Paths (LSPs) set up in Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) or Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) networks can be used to form links to carry traffic in those networks or in other (client) networks.
Protocol mechanisms already exist to facilitate the establishment of such LSPs and to bundle traffic engineering (TE) links to reduce the load on routing protocols. This document defines extensions to those mechanisms to support identifying the use to which such LSPs are to be put and to enable the TE link endpoints to be assigned addresses or unnumbered identifiers during the signaling process. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6163 - Framework for GMPLS and Path Computation Element (PCE) Control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSONs)
This document provides a framework for applying Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) and the Path Computation Element (PCE) architecture to the control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSONs). In particular, it examines Routing and Wavelength Assignment (RWA) of optical paths.
This document focuses on topological elements and path selection constraints that are common across different WSON environments; as such, it does not address optical impairments in any depth. This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC6205 - Generalized Labels for Lambda-Switch-Capable (LSC) Label Switching Routers
Technology in the optical domain is constantly evolving, and, as a consequence, new equipment providing lambda switching capability has been developed and is currently being deployed.
Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) is a family of protocols that can be used to operate networks built from a range of technologies including wavelength (or lambda) switching. For this purpose, GMPLS defined a wavelength label as only having significance between two neighbors. Global wavelength semantics are not considered.
In order to facilitate interoperability in a network composed of next generation lambda-switch-capable equipment, this document defines a standard lambda label format that is compliant with the Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing (CWDM) grids defined by the International Telecommunication Union Telecommunication Standardization Sector. The label format defined in this document can be used in GMPLS signaling and routing protocols. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6344 - Operating Virtual Concatenation (VCAT) and the Link Capacity Adjustment Scheme (LCAS) with Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
This document describes requirements for, and the use of, the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) control plane in support of the Virtual Concatenation (VCAT) layer 1 inverse multiplexing data plane mechanism and its companion Link Capacity Adjustment Scheme (LCAS). LCAS can be used for hitless dynamic resizing of the inverse multiplex group. These techniques apply to Optical Transport Network (OTN), Synchronous Optical Network (SONET), Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH), and Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy (PDH) signals. This document updates RFC 4606 by making modifications to the procedures for supporting virtual concatenation. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6373 - MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) Control Plane Framework
The MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) supports static provisioning of transport paths via a Network Management System (NMS) and dynamic provisioning of transport paths via a control plane. This document provides the framework for MPLS-TP dynamic provisioning and covers control-plane addressing, routing, path computation, signaling, traffic engineering, and path recovery. MPLS-TP uses GMPLS as the control plane for MPLS-TP Label Switched Paths (LSPs). MPLS-TP also uses the pseudowire (PW) control plane for pseudowires. Management-plane functions are out of scope of this document.
This document is a product of a joint Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) / International Telecommunication Union Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) effort to include an MPLS Transport Profile within the IETF MPLS and Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) architectures to support the capabilities and functionalities of a packet transport network as defined by the ITU-T.
This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC6387 - GMPLS Asymmetric Bandwidth Bidirectional Label Switched Paths (LSPs)
This document defines a method for the support of GMPLS asymmetric bandwidth bidirectional Label Switched Paths (LSPs). The approach presented is applicable to any switching technology and builds on the original Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) model for the transport of traffic-related parameters. This document moves the experiment documented in RFC 5467 to the standards track and obsoletes RFC 5467. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6510 - Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Message Formats for Label Switched Path (LSP) Attributes Objects
Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) established using the Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) extensions may be signaled with a set of LSP-specific attributes. These attributes may be carried in both Path and Resv messages. This document specifies how LSP attributes are to be carried in RSVP Path and Resv messages using the Routing Backus-Naur Form and clarifies related Resv message formats. This document updates RFC 4875 and RFC 5420. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6566 - A Framework for the Control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSONs) with Impairments
As an optical signal progresses along its path, it may be altered by the various physical processes in the optical fibers and devices it encounters. When such alterations result in signal degradation, these processes are usually referred to as "impairments". These physical characteristics may be important constraints to consider when using a GMPLS control plane to support path setup and maintenance in wavelength switched optical networks.
This document provides a framework for applying GMPLS protocols and the Path Computation Element (PCE) architecture to support Impairment-Aware Routing and Wavelength Assignment (IA-RWA) in wavelength switched optical networks. Specifically, this document discusses key computing constraints, scenarios, and architectural processes: routing, wavelength assignment, and impairment validation. This document does not define optical data plane aspects; impairment parameters; or measurement of, or assessment and qualification of, a route; rather, it describes the architectural and information components for protocol solutions. This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC6689 - Usage of the RSVP ASSOCIATION Object
The Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) ASSOCIATION object is defined in the context of GMPLS-controlled label switched paths (LSPs). In this context, the object is used to associate recovery LSPs with the LSP they are protecting. This document reviews how the association is to be provided in the context of GMPLS recovery. No new procedures or mechanisms are defined by this document, and it is strictly informative in nature. This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC6777 - Label Switched Path (LSP) Data Path Delay Metrics in Generalized MPLS and MPLS Traffic Engineering (MPLS-TE) Networks
When setting up a Label Switched Path (LSP) in Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) and MPLS Traffic Engineering (MPLS-TE) networks, the completion of the signaling process does not necessarily mean that the cross-connection along the LSP has been programmed accordingly and in a timely manner. Meanwhile, the completion of the signaling process may be used by LSP users or applications that control their use as an indication that the data path has become usable. The existence of the inconsistency between the signaling messages and cross-connection programming, and the possible failure of cross- connection programming, if not properly treated, will result in data loss or even application failure. Characterization of this performance can thus help designers to improve the way in which LSPs are used and to make applications or tools that depend on and use LSPs more robust. This document defines a series of performance metrics to evaluate the connectivity of the data path in the signaling process. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6780 - RSVP ASSOCIATION Object Extensions
The RSVP ASSOCIATION object was defined in the context of GMPLS-controlled Label Switched Paths (LSPs). In this context, the object is used to associate recovery LSPs with the LSP they are protecting. This object also has broader applicability as a mechanism to associate RSVP state. This document defines how the ASSOCIATION object can be more generally applied. This document also defines Extended ASSOCIATION objects that, in particular, can be used in the context of the MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP). This document updates RFC 2205, RFC 3209, and RFC 3473. It also generalizes the definition of the Association ID field defined in RFC 4872. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6825 - Traffic Engineering Database Management Information Base in Support of MPLS-TE/GMPLS
This memo defines the Management Information Base (MIB) objects for managing the Traffic Engineering Database (TED) information with extensions in support of the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) with Traffic Engineering (TE) as well as Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) for use with network management protocols. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6827 - Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON) Routing for OSPFv2 Protocols
The ITU-T has defined an architecture and requirements for operating an Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON).
The Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocol suite is designed to provide a control plane for a range of network technologies. These include optical networks such as time division multiplexing (TDM) networks including the Synchronous Optical Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH), Optical Transport Networks (OTNs), and lambda switching optical networks.
The requirements for GMPLS routing to satisfy the requirements of ASON routing and an evaluation of existing GMPLS routing protocols are provided in other documents. This document defines extensions to the OSPFv2 Link State Routing Protocol to meet the requirements for routing in an ASON.
Note that this work is scoped to the requirements and evaluation expressed in RFC 4258 and RFC 4652 and the ITU-T Recommendations that were current when those documents were written. Future extensions or revisions of this work may be necessary if the ITU-T Recommendations are revised or if new requirements are introduced into a revision of RFC 4258. This document obsoletes RFC 5787 and updates RFC 5786. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC6898 - Link Management Protocol Behavior Negotiation and Configuration Modifications
The Link Management Protocol (LMP) is used to coordinate the properties, use, and faults of data links in networks controlled by Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS). This document defines an extension to LMP to negotiate capabilities and indicate support for LMP extensions. The defined extension is compatible with non-supporting implementations.
This document updates RFC 4204, RFC 4207, RFC 4209, and RFC 5818.
RFC7062 - Framework for GMPLS and PCE Control of G.709 Optical Transport Networks
This document provides a framework to allow the development of protocol extensions to support Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) and Path Computation Element (PCE) control of Optical Transport Networks (OTNs) as specified in ITU-T Recommendation G.709 as published in 2012.
RFC7074 - Revised Definition of the GMPLS Switching Capability and Type Fields
GMPLS provides control for multiple switching technologies and for hierarchical switching within a technology. GMPLS routing and signaling use common values to indicate the type of switching technology. These values are carried in routing protocols via the Switching Capability field, and in signaling protocols via the Switching Type field. While the values used in these fields are the primary indicators of the technology and hierarchy level being controlled, the values are not consistently defined and used across the different technologies supported by GMPLS. This document is intended to resolve the inconsistent definition and use of the Switching Capability and Type fields by narrowly scoping the meaning and use of the fields. This document updates all documents that use the GMPLS Switching Capability and Types fields, in particular RFCs 3471, 4202, 4203, and 5307.
RFC7096 - Evaluation of Existing GMPLS Encoding against G.709v3 Optical Transport Networks (OTNs)
ITU-T recommendation G.709-2012 has introduced new fixed and flexible Optical channel Data Unit (ODU) containers in Optical Transport Networks (OTNs).
This document provides an evaluation of existing Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) routing and signaling protocols against the G.709 OTNs.
RFC7138 - Traffic Engineering Extensions to OSPF for GMPLS Control of Evolving G.709 Optical Transport Networks
This document describes Open Shortest Path First - Traffic Engineering (OSPF-TE) routing protocol extensions to support GMPLS control of Optical Transport Networks (OTNs) specified in ITU-T Recommendation G.709 as published in 2012. It extends mechanisms defined in RFC 4203.
RFC7139 - GMPLS Signaling Extensions for Control of Evolving G.709 Optical Transport Networks
ITU-T Recommendation G.709 [G709-2012] introduced new Optical channel Data Unit (ODU) containers (ODU0, ODU4, ODU2e, and ODUflex) and enhanced Optical Transport Network (OTN) flexibility.
This document updates the ODU-related portions of RFC 4328 to provide extensions to GMPLS signaling to control the full set of OTN features, including ODU0, ODU4, ODU2e, and ODUflex.
RFC7260 - GMPLS RSVP-TE Extensions for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Configuration
Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) is an integral part of transport connections; hence, it is required that OAM functions be activated/deactivated in sync with connection commissioning/ decommissioning, in order to avoid spurious alarms and ensure consistent operation. In certain technologies, OAM entities are inherently established once the connection is set up, while other technologies require extra configuration to establish and configure OAM entities. This document specifies extensions to Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) to support the establishment and configuration of OAM entities along with Label Switched Path signaling.
RFC7369 - GMPLS RSVP-TE Extensions for Ethernet Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Configuration
The work related to GMPLS Ethernet Label Switching (GELS) extended GMPLS RSVP-TE to support the establishment of Ethernet Label Switching Paths (LSPs). IEEE Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) specifies an adjunct Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) flow to check connectivity in Ethernet networks. CFM can also be used with Ethernet LSPs for fault detection and triggering recovery mechanisms. The ITU-T Y.1731 specification builds on CFM and specifies additional OAM mechanisms, including Performance Monitoring, for Ethernet networks. This document specifies extensions of the GMPLS RSVP-TE protocol to support the setup of the associated Ethernet OAM entities of Ethernet LSPs and defines the Ethernet technology-specific TLVs based on the GMPLS OAM Configuration Framework. This document supports, but does not modify, the IEEE and ITU-T OAM mechanisms.
RFC7446 - Routing and Wavelength Assignment Information Model for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks
This document provides a model of information needed by the Routing and Wavelength Assignment (RWA) process in Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSONs). The purpose of the information described in this model is to facilitate constrained optical path computation in WSONs. This model takes into account compatibility constraints between WSON signal attributes and network elements but does not include constraints due to optical impairments. Aspects of this information that may be of use to other technologies utilizing a GMPLS control plane are discussed.
RFC7487 - Configuration of Proactive Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Functions for MPLS-Based Transport Networks Using RSVP-TE
This specification describes the configuration of proactive MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) functions for a given Label Switched Path (LSP) using a set of TLVs that are carried by the GMPLS RSVP-TE protocol based on the OAM Configuration Framework for GMPLS RSVP-TE.
RFC7579 - General Network Element Constraint Encoding for GMPLS-Controlled Networks
Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) can be used to control a wide variety of technologies. In some of these technologies, network elements and links may impose additional routing constraints such as asymmetric switch connectivity, non-local label assignment, and label range limitations on links.
This document provides efficient, protocol-agnostic encodings for general information elements representing connectivity and label constraints as well as label availability. It is intended that protocol-specific documents will reference this memo to describe how information is carried for specific uses.
RFC7580 - OSPF-TE Extensions for General Network Element Constraints
Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) can be used to control a wide variety of technologies including packet switching (e.g., MPLS), time division (e.g., Synchronous Optical Network / Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) and Optical Transport Network (OTN)), wavelength (lambdas), and spatial switching (e.g., incoming port or fiber to outgoing port or fiber). In some of these technologies, network elements and links may impose additional routing constraints such as asymmetric switch connectivity, non- local label assignment, and label range limitations on links. This document describes Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol extensions to support these kinds of constraints under the control of GMPLS.
RFC7581 - Routing and Wavelength Assignment Information Encoding for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks
A Wavelength Switched Optical Network (WSON) requires certain key information fields be made available to facilitate path computation and the establishment of Label Switched Paths (LSPs). The information model described in "Routing and Wavelength Assignment Information Model for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks" (RFC 7446) shows what information is required at specific points in the WSON. Part of the WSON information model contains aspects that may be of general applicability to other technologies, while other parts are specific to WSONs.
This document provides efficient, protocol-agnostic encodings for the WSON-specific information fields. It is intended that protocol- specific documents will reference this memo to describe how information is carried for specific uses. Such encodings can be used to extend GMPLS signaling and routing protocols. In addition, these encodings could be used by other mechanisms to convey this same information to a Path Computation Element (PCE).
RFC7688 - GMPLS OSPF Enhancement for Signal and Network Element Compatibility for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks
This document provides Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing enhancements to support signal compatibility constraints associated with Wavelength Switched Optical Network (WSON) elements. These routing enhancements are applicable in common optical or hybrid electro-optical networks where not all the optical signals in the network are compatible with all network elements participating in the network.
This compatibility constraint model is applicable to common optical or hybrid electro-optical systems such as optical-electronic-optical (OEO) switches, regenerators, and wavelength converters, since such systems can be limited to processing only certain types of WSON signals.
RFC7689 - Signaling Extensions for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks
This document provides extensions to Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) signaling for control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSONs). Such extensions are applicable in WSONs under a number of conditions including: (a) when optional processing, such as regeneration, must be configured to occur at specific nodes along a path, (b) where equipment must be configured to accept an optical signal with specific attributes, or (c) where equipment must be configured to output an optical signal with specific attributes. This document provides mechanisms to support distributed wavelength assignment with a choice of distributed wavelength assignment algorithms.
RFC7698 - Framework and Requirements for GMPLS-Based Control of Flexi-Grid Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) Networks
To allow efficient allocation of optical spectral bandwidth for systems that have high bit-rates, the International Telecommunication Union Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) has extended its Recommendations G.694.1 and G.872 to include a new Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) grid by defining a set of nominal central frequencies, channel spacings, and the concept of the "frequency slot". In such an environment, a data-plane connection is switched based on allocated, variable-sized frequency ranges within the optical spectrum, creating what is known as a flexible grid (flexi-grid).
Given the specific characteristics of flexi-grid optical networks and their associated technology, this document defines a framework and the associated control-plane requirements for the application of the existing GMPLS architecture and control-plane protocols to the control of flexi-grid DWDM networks. The actual extensions to the GMPLS protocols will be defined in companion documents.
RFC7699 - Generalized Labels for the Flexi-Grid in Lambda Switch Capable (LSC) Label Switching Routers
GMPLS supports the description of optical switching by identifying entries in fixed lists of switchable wavelengths (called grids) through the encoding of lambda labels. Work within the ITU-T Study Group 15 has defined a finer-granularity grid, and the facility to flexibly select different widths of spectrum from the grid. This document defines a new GMPLS lambda label format to support this flexi-grid.
This document updates RFCs 3471 and 6205 by introducing a new label format.
RFC7792 - RSVP-TE Signaling Extensions in Support of Flexi-Grid Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) Networks
This memo describes the extensions to the Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling protocol to support Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in a GMPLS-controlled network that includes devices using the flexible optical grid.
RFC7892 - IANA Allocation Procedures for the GMPLS OTN Signal Type Registry
IANA defined the "OTN Signal Type" subregistry of the "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Parameters" registry in RFC 7139. This document updates the "OTN Signal Type" subregistry to allow registration via Specification Required.
RFC7963 - RSVP-TE Extension for Additional Signal Types in G.709 Optical Transport Networks (OTNs)
RFCs 4328 and 7139 provide signaling extensions in Resource ReserVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) to control the full set of Optical Transport Network (OTN) features. However, these specifications do not cover the additional Optical channel Data Unit (ODU) containers defined in G.Sup43 (ODU1e, ODU3e1, and ODU3e2). This document defines new Signal Types for these additional containers.