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RFC4423 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Architecture
This memo describes a snapshot of the reasoning behind a proposed new namespace, the Host Identity namespace, and a new protocol layer, the Host Identity Protocol (HIP), between the internetworking and transport layers. Herein are presented the basics of the current namespaces, their strengths and weaknesses, and how a new namespace will add completeness to them. The roles of this new namespace in the protocols are defined. The memo describes the thinking of the authors as of Fall 2003. The architecture may have evolved since. This document represents one stable point in that evolution of understanding. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5201 - Host Identity Protocol
This memo specifies the details of the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). HIP allows consenting hosts to securely establish and maintain shared IP-layer state, allowing separation of the identifier and locator roles of IP addresses, thereby enabling continuity of communications across IP address changes. HIP is based on a Sigma-compliant Diffie- Hellman key exchange, using public key identifiers from a new Host Identity namespace for mutual peer authentication. The protocol is designed to be resistant to denial-of-service (DoS) and man-in-the- middle (MitM) attacks. When used together with another suitable security protocol, such as the Encapsulated Security Payload (ESP), it provides integrity protection and optional encryption for upper- layer protocols, such as TCP and UDP. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5202 - Using the Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) Transport Format with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP)
This memo specifies an Encapsulated Security Payload (ESP) based mechanism for transmission of user data packets, to be used with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5203 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Registration Extension
This document specifies a registration mechanism for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) that allows hosts to register with services, such as HIP rendezvous servers or middleboxes. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5204 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Rendezvous Extension
This document defines a rendezvous extension for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). The rendezvous extension extends HIP and the HIP registration extension for initiating communication between HIP nodes via HIP rendezvous servers. Rendezvous servers improve reachability and operation when HIP nodes are multi-homed or mobile. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5205 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Domain Name System (DNS) Extensions
This document specifies a new resource record (RR) for the Domain Name System (DNS), and how to use it with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). This RR allows a HIP node to store in the DNS its Host Identity (HI, the public component of the node public-private key pair), Host Identity Tag (HIT, a truncated hash of its public key), and the Domain Names of its rendezvous servers (RVSs). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5206 - End-Host Mobility and Multihoming with the Host Identity Protocol
This document defines mobility and multihoming extensions to the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). Specifically, this document defines a general "LOCATOR" parameter for HIP messages that allows for a HIP host to notify peers about alternate addresses at which it may be reached. This document also defines elements of procedure for mobility of a HIP host -- the process by which a host dynamically changes the primary locator that it uses to receive packets. While the same LOCATOR parameter can also be used to support end-host multihoming, detailed procedures are left for further study. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5338 - Using the Host Identity Protocol with Legacy Applications
This document is an informative overview of how legacy applications can be made to work with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). HIP proposes to add a cryptographic name space for network stack names. From an application viewpoint, HIP-enabled systems support a new address family of host identifiers, but it may be a long time until such HIP-aware applications are widely deployed even if host systems are upgraded. This informational document discusses implementation and Application Programming Interface (API) issues relating to using HIP in situations in which the system is HIP-aware but the applications are not, and is intended to aid implementors and early adopters in thinking about and locally solving systems issues regarding the incremental deployment of HIP. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5770 - Basic Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Extensions for Traversal of Network Address Translators
This document specifies extensions to the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) to facilitate Network Address Translator (NAT) traversal. The extensions are based on the use of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) methodology to discover a working path between two end-hosts, and on standard techniques for encapsulating Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) packets within the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). This document also defines elements of a procedure for NAT traversal, including the optional use of a HIP relay server. With these extensions HIP is able to work in environments that have NATs and provides a generic NAT traversal solution to higher-layer networking applications. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6028 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Multi-Hop Routing Extension
This document specifies two extensions to the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) to implement multi-hop routing. The first extension allows implementing source routing in HIP. That is, a node sending a HIP packet can define a set of nodes that the HIP packet should traverse. The second extension allows a HIP packet to carry and record the list of nodes that forwarded it. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6078 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Immediate Carriage and Conveyance of Upper-Layer Protocol Signaling (HICCUPS)
This document defines a new Host Identity Protocol (HIP) packet type called DATA. HIP DATA packets are used to reliably convey authenticated arbitrary protocol messages over various overlay networks. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6079 - HIP BONE: Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Based Overlay Networking Environment (BONE)
This document specifies a framework to build HIP-based (Host Identity Protocol) overlay networks. This framework uses HIP to perform connection management. Other functions, such as data storage and retrieval or overlay maintenance, are implemented using protocols other than HIP. These protocols are loosely referred to as "peer protocols". This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6253 - Host Identity Protocol Certificates
The Certificate (CERT) parameter is a container for digital certificates. It is used for carrying these certificates in Host Identity Protocol (HIP) control packets. This document specifies the CERT parameter and the error signaling in case of a failed verification. Additionally, this document specifies the representations of Host Identity Tags in X.509 version 3 (v3) and Simple Public Key Infrastructure (SPKI) certificates.
The concrete use of certificates, including how certificates are obtained, requested, and which actions are taken upon successful or failed verification, is specific to the scenario in which the certificates are used. Hence, the definition of these scenario- specific aspects is left to the documents that use the CERT parameter.
This document updates RFC 5201. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6261 - Encrypted Signaling Transport Modes for the Host Identity Protocol
This document specifies two transport modes for Host Identity Protocol (HIP) signaling messages that allow them to be conveyed over encrypted connections initiated with the Host Identity Protocol. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC6317 - Basic Socket Interface Extensions for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP)
This document defines extensions to the current sockets API for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). The extensions focus on the use of public-key-based identifiers discovered via DNS resolution, but also define interfaces for manual bindings between Host Identity Tags (HITs) and locators. With the extensions, the application can also support more relaxed security models where communication can be non-HIP-based, according to local policies. The extensions in this document are experimental and provide basic tools for further experimentation with policies. This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC7086 - Host Identity Protocol-Based Overlay Networking Environment (HIP BONE) Instance Specification for REsource LOcation And Discovery (RELOAD)
This document is the HIP-Based Overlay Networking Environment (HIP BONE) instance specification for the REsource LOcation And Discovery (RELOAD) protocol. The document provides the details needed to build a RELOAD-based overlay that uses HIP.
RFC7343 - An IPv6 Prefix for Overlay Routable Cryptographic Hash Identifiers Version 2 (ORCHIDv2)
This document specifies an updated Overlay Routable Cryptographic Hash Identifiers (ORCHID) format that obsoletes that in RFC 4843. These identifiers are intended to be used as endpoint identifiers at applications and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and not as identifiers for network location at the IP layer, i.e., locators. They are designed to appear as application-layer entities and at the existing IPv6 APIs, but they should not appear in actual IPv6 headers. To make them more like regular IPv6 addresses, they are expected to be routable at an overlay level. Consequently, while they are considered non-routable addresses from the IPv6-layer perspective, all existing IPv6 applications are expected to be able to use them in a manner compatible with current IPv6 addresses.
The Overlay Routable Cryptographic Hash Identifiers originally defined in RFC 4843 lacked a mechanism for cryptographic algorithm agility. The updated ORCHID format specified in this document removes this limitation by encoding, in the identifier itself, an index to the suite of cryptographic algorithms in use.
RFC7401 - Host Identity Protocol Version 2 (HIPv2)
This document specifies the details of the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). HIP allows consenting hosts to securely establish and maintain shared IP-layer state, allowing separation of the identifier and locator roles of IP addresses, thereby enabling continuity of communications across IP address changes. HIP is based on a Diffie-Hellman key exchange, using public key identifiers from a new Host Identity namespace for mutual peer authentication. The protocol is designed to be resistant to denial-of-service (DoS) and man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks. When used together with another suitable security protocol, such as the Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP), it provides integrity protection and optional encryption for upper-layer protocols, such as TCP and UDP.
This document obsoletes RFC 5201 and addresses the concerns raised by the IESG, particularly that of crypto agility. It also incorporates lessons learned from the implementations of RFC 5201.
RFC7402 - Using the Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) Transport Format with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP)
This memo specifies an Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) based mechanism for transmission of user data packets, to be used with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). This document obsoletes RFC 5202.
RFC8002 - Host Identity Protocol Certificates
The Certificate (CERT) parameter is a container for digital certificates. It is used for carrying these certificates in Host Identity Protocol (HIP) control packets. This document specifies the certificate parameter and the error signaling in case of a failed verification. Additionally, this document specifies the representations of Host Identity Tags (HITs) in X.509 version 3 (v3).
The concrete use cases of certificates, including how certificates are obtained and requested and which actions are taken upon successful or failed verification, are specific to the scenario in which the certificates are used. Hence, the definition of these scenario-specific aspects is left to the documents that use the CERT parameter.
This document updates RFC 7401 and obsoletes RFC 6253.
RFC8003 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Registration Extension
This document specifies a registration mechanism for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) that allows hosts to register with services, such as HIP rendezvous servers or middleboxes. This document obsoletes RFC 5203.
RFC8004 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Rendezvous Extension
This document defines a rendezvous extension for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). The rendezvous extension extends HIP and the HIP Registration Extension for initiating communication between HIP nodes via HIP rendezvous servers. Rendezvous servers improve reachability and operation when HIP nodes are multihomed or mobile. This document obsoletes RFC 5204.
RFC8005 - Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Domain Name System (DNS) Extension
This document specifies a resource record (RR) for the Domain Name System (DNS) and how to use it with the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). This RR allows a HIP node to store in the DNS its Host Identity (HI), the public component of the node public-private key pair; its Host Identity Tag (HIT), a truncated hash of its public key (PK); and the domain names of its rendezvous servers (RVSs). This document obsoletes RFC 5205.
RFC8046 - Host Mobility with the Host Identity Protocol
This document defines a mobility extension to the Host Identity Protocol (HIP). Specifically, this document defines a "LOCATOR_SET" parameter for HIP messages that allows for a HIP host to notify peers about alternate addresses at which it may be reached. This document also defines how the parameter can be used to preserve communications across a change to the IP address used by one or both peer hosts. The same LOCATOR_SET parameter can also be used to support end-host multihoming (as specified in RFC 8047). This document obsoletes RFC 5206.
RFC8047 - Host Multihoming with the Host Identity Protocol
This document defines host multihoming extensions to the Host Identity Protocol (HIP), by leveraging protocol components defined for host mobility.